FORM 2/2015

THE NEW WORKPLACE AND ARCTIC ARCHITECTURE

Do you read work e-mails on your couch at home? Or do you work in a flexible office with more employees than desktops? Welcome to the new work life. The latest issue of Form Magazine explores the changing world of working and how it affects our workplaces.

In the contemporary world of work, we are basically free to work where we want: in the kitchen or at a wifi supplied café. But at the same time we see a reduction in employers' responsibilities towards employees. Permanent jobs are replaced by freelancers and project contracts. What does it do with us as human beings, and how does it affect the interiors of our workplaces?

In the new issue of Form, Salka Hallström Bornold analyses the conditions for white collars of our time:
- The majority of those who work from home, do it a few hours a week. Office people didn't become part-time sheep farmers and the open landscape was thwarted, by one reason only: the control need of managers."

Focus on accessories

The furniture industry is also in a strong state of change. More and more architects and designers have recently chosen to embark on the hot market of accessories. These include architects Claesson Koivisto Rune, with their collection Smaller Objects, and designer Alexander Lervik, who launched the new brand Tingest last year.

- This comes with the times, in the way that designers are taking matters into their own hands today, says Eero Koivisto in the article in Form. There is a revolution happening with 3D printers and young people designing and making things themselves. It is an awesome paradigm shift that also inspired us. I believe that this work method will become more common among designers; just as in the worlds of art and music people want to make things themselves.

Arctic architecture

In the latest issue of Form, you also find a major feature on arctic architecture with photographs by Martina Hoogland Ivanow.

- Since we took over Form Magazine, we have had the ambition to work with the best photographers in Sweden, says Editor in Chief Bo Madestrand. Martina Hoogland Ivanow has for long been on our wish list, and now we finally got her.

Because of the 110-year anniversary of Form, the magazine takes the opportunity to change its logo, designed by the Art Director of Form: Kai Ristilä.

Form 2/2015 is in stores and with subscribers on April 7.